Avoid Heartbreak from Bad Skin Caused by Sugar

If a slimmer waistline isn’t enough reason for you to go easy on the sweets, maybe wishing for smooth, glowing skin will motivate you.

“The skin is a reflection of your total body health,” says New York dermatologist Cheryl Karcher MD. Skin experts agree that aside from obesity and diabetes, too much sugar can have bad effects on skin.

Two of the major skin disasters that could occur with excessive intake of processed sugar are inflammation, and glycation that makes the skin rigid. More reasons for you to curb your sweet tooth this Valentine’s season, right?

Inflammation, the Immune System and Testosterone  Production

Simple carbohydrates like fried food, candy pasta, packaged snacks, and sodas are main culprits that cause inflammation.

High-glycemic food and beverages are rapidly converted to sugar, raising insulin levels that lead to “a burst of inflammation throughout the body,” according to Nicholas Perricone, M.D., best-selling author of The Wrinkle Cure, and The Perricone Prescription. High-glycemic food brings great pressure on the body to work harder than it should, so it could deal with food that was recently consumed.

This results in the body becoming inflamed after carb-heavy meals. Consuming high-glycemic food in abundance affects organs like the heart, lungs, and the skin.

In addition, Dr. Harold Lancer, dermatologist to Hollywood stars like Kim Kardashian and Beyoncé stated in his book that “sugar can weaken the immune system, and a suppressed immune system is bad at fighting off bacteria.” Fact: pores clogged with bacteria causes pimples.

More sugar also increases testosterone production, which “makes pores larger,” and makes the skin oilier, according to Dr. Lancer.

Glycation

Glycation is a process wherein digested sugar attaches itself to collagen. Collagen is the protein fiber that keeps skin smooth and supple. Collagen weakened by glucose becomes inflexible, which dries up the skin and ups the probability of premature sagging, as well as wrinkling. Glycation can also make acne and rosacea worse.

Good Skin Health is Wealth

It’s important to remember that amazing skin depends on a combination of factors including genetics, environmental factors and skin care regimens, aside from lifestyle factors like food choices. Adapting a low-sugar diet just might be the key to boost your skin health!

See for yourself if swapping sugar with an all-natural, carb-free no-sugar sweetener like Leaflife Stevia will get you on the way to having healthier skin. Besides the benefit of lowering chances of breakouts and other skin conditions associated with high sugar intake, Leaflife Stevia is good for: diabetics, for weight watchers, for managing hypertension, and for protecting oral health.

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Sources: http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/04/sugar-skin-face-beauty.html

http://www.totaldermatology.com/why-sugar-is-bad-for-your-skin-from-acne-to-wrinkles/